The House

Greywalls Hotel, with its wrap-around formal walled garden of about six acres, was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens in 1901. We are open all year round.

Greywalls was built as a holiday home for its original owner, the Hon. Alfred Lyttelton. Lyttleton, a keen golfer, insisted that the house be built ‘within a mashie niblick shot of the eighteenth green at Muirfield’.

With its warm honey coloured stone from the local Rattlebags Quarry, pantiles from Denmark and its crescent shaped symmetry it was always one of the Edwin Lutyen’s favourites.

In 1905 Mr. William James bought Greywalls and, finding that the house was not big enough for his family, had the lodges at the gate built on in 1908 to accommodate staff and asked Sir Robert Lorimer, one of Scotland’s leading architects, to build on the ‘Nursery’ wing to the West in 1911.

Gallery

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Before the First World War the lovely Mrs Willy James, wife of the second owner, used to entertain Edward VII here, at Greywalls. The house was not large enough for the James’ parties and they commissioned Sir Robert Lorimer, one of Scotlands’ most famous architects to build a ‘nursery’ wing in 1911, having already added a fine entrance courtyard and lodges to house the staff in 1908. So Greywalls is not only the sole surviving Lutyens house in Scotland today, it is also the only house which can boast examples of the work of two of the UK’s leading architects of their day.

In 1924 Lt. Col. Sir James Horlick, great grandfather of Giles Weaver, bought the house. The Weaver family used it as their summer holiday house until the beginning of World War Two. The Weaver family have done their utmost to preserve the character of the original Lutyens design by continuing to use Rattlebags stone from a local quarry worked by monks, and the ‘pan tiles’ made specially in Holland.

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